ABOUT THE ARTIST

Speaker 2:It's been good. When you're on the road, you can get kind of different ideas musically, because you're working in front of a crowd instead of in front of like screen at your home. And there's a lot of downtime when you can just kind of fiddle with things on a computer. Like the last time I went on a larger tour, I made a bunch of beats in the van, or started a bunch of beats, and then those later became stuff that ... beats with my new album, so it's definitely a good thing. It gets the creative juices flowing. And if you don't do stuff there, usually when I get back from a tour I'm usually ready to be creative, you know, since I've been sitting down for two weeks.
It's fun, man. Because you know, music is just part of what I like to do, and I'm kind of more of a silly person than I am a serious person, so the blog gives me an outlet for that. It also gives me an outlet to, you know, if I ever have anything exclusive I want to give away, or put people on a new artist and stuff like that. It's just pretty much a platform for me to say whatever I want, and you know, that's for the better or for the worse, really, because you know, definitely have probably lost some friends and fans over that blog.
Oh, it's been huge. It's been huge. Before I had Ableton, I was just using the ASR-10. I did my first three albums on the ASR-10. But with Ableton, it just opens up the horizons for you, I mean, just as far as matching samples and time stretching and all that stuff. I never did that before my last album, and it just made for a completely different style of music. I would never have done that had I not recorded with Ableton and kind of figured out how to use it best for me. That pretty much redefined my sound, I think.
2003. 2003 or 2004. When I signed to Digitune and went on my first tour is when I quit my other job, which I was getting paid under the table for anyway so I wasn't really reporting anything. Then yeah, after that, once I got a steady income from music, that was like ... Yeah, 2004 is probably when I stopped having to work other jobs.
Speaker 3:Excellent.
Speaker 2:Yeah, so far so good. Ask me again in two years. [inaudible 00:03:22]
I never think about that. That's one thing. Well, first of all, my friends don't give a shit about my music. They don't care at all. Which is ... I kind of appreciate that. And my family, you know, they're old. They pretend, they're like, "Oh, it's great." But you know, they're like 80 and stuff. They don't like hip hop, like, instrumental music. So in that sense, I don't think about it.
But you know, as far as leaving behind music that I've recorded, I'm glad it exists and it definitely fits into a very particular time period, and kind of a period where music changed in a sense of, like, the internet became a huge thing, spread the word around, whereas before it was more like, you know, people bought magazines and stuff like that. [crosstalk 00:04:33] I feel like it encapsules that, the beginning of that time, and moving on I think hopefully it'll stand up.