ABOUT THE ARTIST

blue shirt: That's the hottest joint in the city right about now. I guess in the whole region of the United States.
ODB: It's that underground shaboot. You know what I'm saying. It's like everybody is scared to come through with that because you've got so much, you know what I'm saying, like rap music going down and you know, musical tones and notes, you know what I'm saying.
white shirt: Yeah, yeah, yeah.
ODB: It's just like the Brooklyn, too, it's like, you know what I'm saying, it's real ... The true name of it is Shame on you when you step through to. You know what I'm saying? It's got that straight up underground, you know what I'm saying. It ain't no cut to it or nothing, no lactose or nothing ... you know what I'm saying. Just keeping it raw, you know what I'm saying.
blue shirt: That concept ... Where'd that concept come from for that video man? You've got China Town and blowing up-[inaudible 00:00:45][crosstalk 00:00:45]
ODB: I just wanted to come up with something different man, you know what I'm saying. You got ... Every time you got people making things that come from the ghetto or whatever, you know what I'm saying. I'm from the ghetto and I'm gonna always be from the ghetto you know what I'm saying, like ... The mentality it ain't got to be like, you know what I'm saying from the ghetto, you know what I'm saying. You know we got to keep it ... See, black people we gotta know how to go on different heights and things, Man.
blue shirt: Right, right, right.
ODB: You know what I'm saying. It's still banging. You still catching a little laugh in there, a little what ... you know what I'm saying, a little whatsoever.
blue shirt: Who was that ... Who was Pookie the other character here? Who was that?
ODB: Nah, that's my father ... when he was like 17.
blue shirt: That's serious with the gold teeth.
white shirt: Got the walk and everything. [inaudible 00:01:32]
ODB: Nah, that's Old Dirty, man, for those who don't know.
blue shirt: All right.
ODB: Let me answer that telephone line, here.
blue shirt: Yeah, go ahead, real quick.
ODB: Yo, what's up? What's up baby?
blue shirt: Can we bring it up?
ODB: All right. Yeah, hold on man.
blue shirt: Speaker. Speaker.
What's up?
Caller-Male-1: Yeah, I want to say big ups to you Baps.
blue shirt: All right, kid.
Caller-Male-1: Man, I'm in love with you B. You so real, it's not even funny, Man.
blue shirt: All right, Man.
ODB: True, true.
Caller-Male-1: Smoking.
ODB: Big Mac's definitely got it going on, kid.
blue shirt: Old Dirty B, definitely got it going on.
Caller-Male-1: New track? It's coming out already, right, it's out? Because I just came back, Man.
white shirt: It's been out, Man.
blue shirt: It's been out.
Caller-Male-1: Yo, and it's all that B.
ODB: Thanks a lot, Man.
blue shirt: Gotta take this next caller, Peace yo.
Hello.
Go ahead. What's up?
ODB: Talk to me, talk to me. What's up?
Speaker 5: Yo, you the man, kid, you shit is packed.
ODB: Thanks a lot, man.
Speaker 5: It's coming out to my city. I'm definitely getting into that shit. You the man.
ODB: All right man. Yo, yo, yo, that ain't nothing man, check the album, kid. The album is like the nuclear.
Speaker 5: No doubt. No doubt. I'm gonna get the album.
ODB: The album is definitely banging.
Speaker 5: I know that.
ODB: I ain't look at the camera one time, yet. I don't be ... I ain't, you know what I'm saying, too good on the cameras, man.
Speaker 5: All right, we see you anyway.
ODB: All right.
Good looking, man.
blue shirt: Thanks a lot, kid.
Speaker 5: All right, kid. Later.
blue shirt: Peace.
Yo, listen, Old D ... Old Dirty Bastard, you got to rip it a little something. You gotta close the show up real quick, kid.
ODB: All right. I'll give a little something to the family out there, you know what I'm saying.
white shirt:You want to stand up, because I want to feel it, man.
ODB: Yo, yo. To my niggers and my niggerettes and shaboot Busta joint. Goes like this, you know what I'm saying.
The terminology and psychology, you still expect me to accept. Do what I say off the TV, k, with the button on record and the other on play. Plus, I press pause for a serious cause, to respect and delight, with the gratifying. Now that I'm ready, let the music begin. As I detect what I unroll with my ball point. Through the time that I spent, the money that I lent. Rap records went up, just about ain't since. Then it came a new way to getting paid. They said rhyming on the mic is the number one trade. When the brother get the feeling that he want to play cool. The discobuburated diabolical fool. [inaudible 00:03:39] go play in the mud. You know a twentieth, you know another century, modern day ... It's a [inaudible 00:03:46] Is the cannibal human or an underground dweller? [inaudible 00:03:49] from the got damn seller, dope fiend addict, while you walk , while you roam. With the acquired immune deficiency syndrome, when the eight MCs came to live off the name. Most rock the rhymes that was all the same. But when I elevated a master the time, you were stimulated from the high post rhyme. You got shot because you knew who you were rock, like the sucker MCs from off my block. Talking to you, you MC crew. I'm not speaking about one nig, I'm speaking about two. Speaking about the nig who swear they can rhyme, you want to battle the god, you lose every time. Re-take the important side my box, but my daughter sells and you did not rock, well it's not my style or your profile. It's just a period of time that nig, rocks for awhile. See, I be the motivating dominating supreme force. The cultivating, activating creaming source. The wise educated and I'm born to be, you and I, to the Q-U-E. Yo peace. Third bass out kid.
blue shirt: Oh my god. We're going to take some more calls, right about now. As you can see, it was mad live.
white shirt: You going to love this.
blue shirt: All right. Let's take some more right about now, what's up, what's up. Hold up, let me see this real quick.
ODB: Old Dirty Bas out.
white shirt: That was the Old Dirty Bas.
blue shirt: What's up? Hello. What's up?
white shirt: Ain't nobody on that line, man.
blue shirt: Hello, what's up?
Speaker 6: Yo, your flow is mad, B. You know what I'm saying. I mean, how you come up with it, for real? You got your own rhythm, your own ... your own flex. Your own mental state.
ODB: Oh, shaboot. That come from like I told y'all, the Al Green and Millie Jackson.
Speaker 6: That's all it is?
ODB: Yeah, man.
Speaker 6: What is that, 20 years? 22?
ODB: Huh. Yeah, why quality self.
Speaker 6: Yo, man, I'm saying, bruh man, you the realest. I mean, what is that ... honestly, it's eight members, right.
ODB: True. True. It's nine.
Speaker 6: You know what I'm saying. People who don't know, gotta know what's up with y'all right now.
ODB: Yo, it's like this. I'll tell you like this, man. Yo, you know what I'm saying. Wu-Tang Clan is coming through. We been coming through. We going to be slamming. You know what I'm saying, Old Dirty Bastard ... Watch when y'all hear my album. Boy, y'all gonna love this one.
Speaker 6: Y'all and Rae, what's up with Rae?
ODB: Rae. Oh baby. Rae coming out, you know what I'm saying, we dropping our songs like Michael Jackson and Janet and them be doing it.
Speaker 6: Now I hear you, man. If anything, I wouldn't be surprised if you came off that mic soon, B, because he can come off with y'all.
blue shirt:All right, kid. Peace, man. We gotta wrap this show up real quick.
Speaker 6: Yo, let me say. Let me put on my brother. Chill right now man.
blue shirt: Go, go ahead. Real quick, kid.
Speaker 7: Wu-Tang Clan forever, yo.
ODB: All right, peace, kid. Good looking.
blue shirt:I'm sorry kid. We have to roll because we gotta be out. See you. I think it's time for us to go. Listen, write to us: PO Box 939 New York, New York 10027. Okay.
white shirt: We got it going on.
blue shirt: All right, for the concerts. We gonna definitely hit you off. Oh my goodness, before I let you go ...
white shirt: It's 4:30, yo.
blue shirt: Aww man, listen, we gotta go. I'm sorry. ODB.
ODB: Let me give a shoutout, man.
blue shirt: Real quick.
ODB: To Big Buddha Monk, 12 o'clock to Brooklyn Zoo. You know what I'm saying, West side and South side. You know what I'm saying. I want to give a shout out to the Wu-Tang Clan, you know what I'm saying. To the West coast. Peace, I'm out, kid.
blue shirt: See you.
white shirt: See you.

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